If you are going through a divorce with children, it is possible that the court will issue a child support order. Child support payments are set up on the legal premise that parents have a duty to support their children. If the court determines that whoever ends up being the custodial parent cannot provide the care that your child needs on his or her income alone, the other spouse may end up paying child support.

 What factors does the court consider?

 Washington Law Help informs that the court will consider both your income and your spouse’s income in determining child support payments. The whole situation will be taken into account, including whether your spouse is supporting other children, if there are other children in your household and if you have a new spouse who has a steady flow of income.

 How much child support will you be asked to pay?

 Again, the amount of child support payments is based on how much is needed to provide for your child’s basic needs. However, there is a limit. You will not be asked to pay more than 45% of your net income.

 ON the other hand, the total amount you end up paying may still end up being more than 45% of your net income, as the court may also ask for you to pay a share in long-distance transportation, education, daycare, insurance premiums and other medical expenses for your child.

 This article is meant to inform and should not be construed as legal advice.